Reviews (DC)

The Brave & the Bold #150


THE BRAVE & THE BOLD #150
(Cover by Jim Aparo)
Published and © by DC, May 1979



“Today Gotham … Tomorrow, the World!”

Synopsis: Batman is captured by a terrorist organization, but gets some unexpected help from one of his keepers.

Writer: Bob Haney
Penciler: Jim Aparo
Inker: Aparo

Review: Reviews of The Brave & the Bold run the risk of sounding the same: Bob Haney (making his 117th B&B appearance here, according to the credits) puts Batman and a guest star du jour through their paces in a madcap, often over-the-top adventure. Along the way, he’ll toss in a kernel or two with real potential (this time out: the Keeper Karns character). In turn, Haney’s scripts are beautifully illustrated by the criminally underrated Jim Aparo (making his 49th appearance). This issue is a typical of their run — and that’s not a bad thing.

Grade: B

Cool factor: Not to sound like a broken record, but let’s go with Jim Aparo here. He’s one of the best Batman artists ever, and doesn’t get nearly enough love.

Notable: This issue’s “The Brave and the Bold” letters page includes a checklist, with credits, of all the team-up issues (#50-150).

Collector’s note: According to the Overstreet Comic Book Price Guide, there’s a Whitman variant of this issue.

Character quotable:Wayne? What could those terrorists want with that playboy??” — Commissioner Gordon, showing why he’s not the world’s greatest detective.

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6 comments to The Brave & the Bold #150

  • Dale

    “Haney’s scripts are beautifully illustrated by the criminally underrated Jim Aparo”

    —————–

    Still my favourite Batman artist ever. with respect due to Frank Miller, Mazzuchelli, Neal Adams, Don Newton, Norm Breyfogle and others.

  • I’m not sure if I’m ready to call Aparo my favorite Batman artist quite yet (Neal Adams and Marshall Rogers still have something to say about that), but it’s his version of the Dark Knight I see in my head. A new appreciation for Aparo’s work has been one of the happy discoveries since launching Comics Bronze Age (the other is how much I’ve enjoyed Mike Grell’s Warlord; they didn’t do much for me as a kid, but I’m lovin’ ’em now).

  • Stephen

    I started reading and collecting B&B when I was a kid and I re-read this issue to death. I absolutely LOVED the checklist in back.

    When you think about it, the secret co-star could have been Martian Manhunter – the only JLA member who never teamed up with Batman in B&B. : )

  • Dale

    I’m loving the artist who gives me “less is more”.

    Earlier my favs were guys who did a lot and who loved realistic, my tastes have somewhat changed (evolved?) and I find the style of John Romita Jr and Jim Aparo much more to my liking.

    My favs Bats artist

    1. Aparo
    2. Rogers
    3. Mazzuchelli
    4. Newton
    5. Adams
    6. Breyfogle

  • Phillip

    Great website, Andrew! I’m really enjoying reading the reviews of these great Bronze Age books. Regarding this particular issue, there actually appears to be a cover credit. There’s a Jim Aparo “JA” signature by Batman’s right ankle. (It’s in red ink, like the background, so it’s easy to overlook.)

  • Phillip:

    Thanks for the kind words. And thanks for pointing out Aparo’s signature. I’ve updated the credit.

    FYI, Comics Bronze Age will be returning at the beginning of 2012. Details coming soon!

    Cheers,
    Andrew

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